UMKC Innovation Center partners with the university and the community to spark and sustain entrepreneurial efforts within our region and across the country.

KCSourceLink connects KC entrepreneurs to the right resource at the right time.

MOSourceLink connects Missouri entrepreneurs to the right resource at the right time.

Whiteboard2Boardroom connects entrepreneurs and businesses to technologies available for licensing.

Digital Sandbox KC provides early-stage proof-of-concept support for digital products.

Missouri Small Business & Technology Development Center provides technical assistance to startup and existing businesses.

ScaleUP! Kansas City helps businesses with revenues around $200K scale toward their first $1 million.

Missouri Procurement Technical Assistance Centers helps local businesses obtain government contracts.

KCInvestED helps investors learn more about investing in KC startups.

SourceLink® helps communities nationwide build vibrant and vital entrepreneurial ecosystems.
UMKC Innovation Center
UMKC Innovation Center

Guide: Start a Business  Part Three

Register and License Your Business

Here are the steps to register and license your new business if you're in Kansas or Missouri.

Part Four: Site Location Assistance/Coworking Space

 

Ready to start a business in Kansas City? You’ll want to make sure your business is legal. Below, you’ll find the six steps you need to take to make sure you have the registrations, licenses and permits for your new business.

Need help? Give us a call at 866-870-6500 or send us your question. We’re here to help you.

So what’s required and who has to do it?

Let’s get started with your first six steps:

  1. Decide on your business structure
  2. Register with the Missouri Secretary of State and/or Kansas Secretary of State
  3. Obtain an Employer Identification Number (EIN)
  4. Register for business taxes in Missouri and/or Kansas
  5. File paperwork to hire employees
  6. Check for city and county licenses and permits, and obtain industry licenses

Now let’s break these steps down.

1. Decide on your business structure.

All businesses must determine a legal organization that defines the rights and liabilities of participants in the business’s ownership, control, personal liability, lifespan and financial structure.

There are different forms of business organization.

  • Sole proprietorship: The vast majority of small businesses start out as sole proprietorships. These firms are owned by one person, usually the individual who has day-to-day responsibility for running the business.
  • Partnership: In this organization, two or more people share ownership of a single business. Like sole proprietorships, the law does not distinguish between the business and its owners.
  • Limited Liability Company (LLC): An LLC is designed to provide the limited liability features of a corporation and the tax efficiencies and operational flexibility of a partnership.
  • Limited Liability Partnership (LLP): A limited liability partnership provides limited liabilities to the partners where each partner is not responsible or liable for the other partner’s actions of negligence.
  • Corporation: A corporation is considered by law to be a unique entity, separate and apart from those who own it. A corporation can be taxed, sued and enter into contractual agreements.

NOTE: The UMKC School of Law has a helpful video on Initial Legal Considerations of Starting a New Business, and their Entrepreneurial Legal Services Clinic offers one-on-one services to entrepreneurs. Apply for their services here.

Confused? We can walk you through it. Give us a call at 816-235-6500 or send us your question.

2. Register with the Missouri or Kansas Secretary of State

Protect your business name by making it legal. To register a business name, contact the Missouri Secretary of State and/or Kansas Secretary of State for application forms and filing requirements.

3. Obtain an Employer Identification Number (EIN)

Employers with employees, business partnerships and corporations must obtain an Employer Identification Number (EIN) from the U.S. Internal Revenue Service. Even if you are a sole proprietor and don’t have employees, it is still good practice to obtain an EIN. It can be used in place of your personal Social Security Number to protect against identify theft. You may also need it to file government forms and banks often require it when applying for loans.

Apply for an Employer Identification Number (EIN) online.

4. Register for business taxes.

Now that you have a legal business, it’s time to pay your Missouri business taxes or your Kansas business taxes. Contact the Missouri Department of Revenue or the Kansas Department of Revenue to complete tax forms based on your business activity, including products sold and used in your business. There are tax assistance offices across the state of Missouri providing services for business owners including volunteer-based tax preparation.

You can also register with the Missouri Department of Labor or the Kansas Department of Labor simultaneously if you will have employees.

5. Ready to hire employees?

If you are hiring employees you will definitely need to file for a federal employer identification number or EIN for tax filing and reporting purposes. (Some banking institutions also require an EIN when applying for funding.) You will also need to register with the Missouri Division of Employment Security or the Kansas Department of Labor for unemployment tax purposes. For a deep dive on what to do if you are employing people, read the State of Missouri Employer’s Tax Guide or the State of Kansas Guide to Employment Security Law.

You may also need to carry coverage for Workers Compensation Insurance. Check to see if you are required to carry coverage at Missouri Division of Workers Compensation or the Kansas Department off Labor.

6. Check for city/county licenses and permits

The state may require additional licenses or business registration paperwork to be completed. It is also important to check with your local city clerk office in Missouri or Kansas where you intend to do business to determine licensing requirements.

Some professions, occupations or activities require special licenses or certifications. Research industry licenses in Missouri or Kansas to find out if your industry has any special requirements. The Missouri SBDCs also offer a guide to licenses and permits that includes where to find out information on Occupational Licenses. Finally, check with the Missouri Division of Professional Registration or the equivalent in Kansas.

The Missouri Department of Agriculture and Kansas Department of Agriculture maintains information about licenses and permits specific to agriculture.

Tap these organizations to get help with registrations, licenses and permits

These Resource Partners can help you figure out what you need to do to set up your business legally in your town or city. Head over to The Resource Navigator to further filter your search by business industry, ZIP code/city/distance and/or specific need.

More resources to help your business get legal help

You may find these resources helpful as you set up your business.

Starting a Business in Missouri Checklist
Legal Services (The Resource Navigator)
Starting a Business Checklist (Missouri SBDC)

Out-of-state businesses

If you are established as a business in another state, check out these links:

Nonprofit

Missouri and Kansas Guidelines

>> Remember if you need help, give us a call at 866-870-6500 or send us a message. We can guide you through the next steps you need to take to start your business.

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